Test Information

View a selection of ARUP's infectious disease testing.

Resources

View forms and documents related to our testing.

FAQs

Infectious disease testing frequently asked questions.

Experts

Visit the experts section to see a list of our specialists.

Welcome to JM’s Infectious Disease

The Infectious Disease laboratories at Jing - Meng offer to test for a wide range of infectious agents that significantly impact patient care and provide expertise in antimicrobial resistance; molecular methods for identification, quantification, and genotyping; and classic culture and stain techniques.

The Infectious Disease processing team provides information on comprehensive testing capabilities and specimen-collection options and offers guidance on available testing alternatives for difficult to collect and irreplaceable specimens.

Laboratory tests

Many infectious diseases have similar signs and symptoms. Samples of your body fluids can sometimes reveal evidence of the particular microbe that's causing your illness. This helps your doctor tailor your treatment.

  • Blood tests: A technician obtains a sample of your blood by inserting a needle into a vein, usually in your arm.
  • Urine tests: This painless test requires you to urinate into a container. To avoid potential contamination of the sample, you may be instructed to cleanse your genital area with an antiseptic pad and to collect the urine midstream.
  • Throat swabs: Samples from your throat, or other moist areas of your body, may be obtained with a sterile swab.
  • Stool sample: You may be instructed to collect a stool sample so a lab can check the sample for parasites and other organisms.
  • Spinal tap (lumbar puncture): This procedure obtains a sample of your cerebrospinal fluid through a needle carefully inserted between the bones of your lower spine. You'll usually be asked to lie on your side with your knees pulled up toward your chest.

Biopsies

During a biopsy, a tiny sample of tissue is taken from an internal organ for testing. For example, a biopsy of lung tissue can be checked for a variety of fungi that can cause a type of pneumonia.

Treatment

Knowing what type of germ is causing your illness makes it easier for your doctor to choose the appropriate treatment.

Antibiotics

Antibiotics are grouped into "families" of similar types. Bacteria also are put together in groups of similar types, such as streptococcus or E. coli.

Certain types of bacteria are especially susceptible to particular classes of antibiotics. Treatment can be targeted more precisely if your doctor knows what type of bacteria you're fighting.

Antibiotics are usually reserved for bacterial infections because these types of drugs have no effect on illnesses caused by viruses. But sometimes it's difficult to tell which type of germ is at work. For example, some types of pneumonia are caused by viruses while others are caused by bacteria.

The overuse of antibiotics has resulted in several types of bacteria developing resistance to one or more varieties of antibiotics. This makes these bacteria much more difficult to treat.

Antivirals

Drugs have been developed to treat some, but not all, viruses. Examples include the viruses that cause:

  • HIV/AIDS
  • Herpes
  • Hepatitis B
  • Hepatitis C
  • Influenza

Antifungals

Topical antifungal medications can be used to treat skin or nail infections caused by fungi. Some fungal infections, such as those affecting the lungs or the mucous membranes, can be treated with an oral antifungal. More severe internal organ fungal infections, especially in people with weakened immune systems, may require intravenous antifungal medications.

Anti-parasitics

Some diseases, including malaria, are caused by tiny parasites. While there are drugs to treat these diseases, some varieties of parasites have developed resistance to the drugs.

Title

  • Small Title
  • Small Title
  • Small Title
  • Small Title

Title

  • Small Title
  • Small Title
  • Small Title
  • Small Title